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The Harvey County Independent
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Halstead, KS 67056
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Old Hardware Store Going Up For Sale

Posted 6/29/2017

MARGARET Kraisinger poses with her “assistant” Sally in the Old Hardware Store at 208 Main Street, Halstead. Kraisinger plans to sell the store, having owned it the past 19 years.MARGARET Kraisinger poses with her “assistant” Sally in the Old Hardware Store at 208 Main Street, Halstead. Kraisinger plans to sell the store, having owned it the past 19 years.By Jared Janzen

HALSTEAD—For 139 years it’s been a fixture on Main Street in Halstead, but now the future of the Old Hardware Store is uncertain. Owner Margaret Kraisinger announced during Monday night’s city council meeting that she is moving forward with plans to sell the store. 

“I’ve been there for 19 years, and it’s time for me to do other things,” she said.

Kraisinger said the store would be put on the market either this week or next week to begin the process. She hopes the store will be sold as is with all its inventory, but if no buyer is found within the given time frame, items will be auctioned off piece by piece.

The historic limestone building was constructed in 1878-79. Kraisinger said stone was used because the wooden buildings there previously had burned down and city leaders had opted to replace them with stone. Through the years, it has always been a hardware store, with 10 owners having occupied the building.

Kraisinger purchased the store in July of 1998 after her retirement from teaching. At that time it had been selling more modern hardware.

“I bought it for the love of the building,” she said, adding that she hadn’t wanted to see it turned into anything other than a hardware store. She said she had fallen in love with the old fixtures, cabinetry, tin ceiling and plank flooring.

“I really wanted to take it and save it, was what my initial thought was, and then after I got in here I thought, ‘Boy, Margaret, you’re going to have to figure out some way to generate income to support this itch that you have,’” she said.

She began work restoring the building right away. She said back then it didn’t look anything like it does now. One year later re-opened during Old Settlers weekend in 1999. After another year, Kraisinger decided to turn the store into an antique hardware store and began collecting architectural and furniture hardware. To get started, she bought four large lots from collectors and antique refinishers.

“Now today I can say with pretty good certainty I have one of the largest selections and collections in the whole area,” she said.

The store’s inventory covers a 100-year span from the Civil War era through the mid-1900s, and every bit of it is authentic—no reproductions.

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