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Halstead, KS 67056
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June 29, 2017
Harvey County IndependentJune 29, 2017 Harvey County Independent

Old Hardware Store Going Up For Sale

Posted 6/29/2017

MARGARET Kraisinger poses with her “assistant” Sally in the Old Hardware Store at 208 Main Street, Halstead. Kraisinger plans to sell the store, having owned it the past 19 years.MARGARET Kraisinger poses with her “assistant” Sally in the Old Hardware Store at 208 Main Street, Halstead. Kraisinger plans to sell the store, having owned it the past 19 years.By Jared Janzen

HALSTEAD—For 139 years it’s been a fixture on Main Street in Halstead, but now the future of the Old Hardware Store is uncertain. Owner Margaret Kraisinger announced during Monday night’s city council meeting that she is moving forward with plans to sell the store. 

“I’ve been there for 19 years, and it’s time for me to do other things,” she said.

Kraisinger said the store would be put on the market either this week or next week to begin the process. She hopes the store will be sold as is with all its inventory, but if no buyer is found within the given time frame, items will be auctioned off piece by piece.

The historic limestone building was constructed in 1878-79. Kraisinger said stone was used because the wooden buildings there previously had burned down and city leaders had opted to replace them with stone. Through the years, it has always been a hardware store, with 10 owners having occupied the building.

Kraisinger purchased the store in July of 1998 after her retirement from teaching. At that time it had been selling more modern hardware.

“I bought it for the love of the building,” she said, adding that she hadn’t wanted to see it turned into anything other than a hardware store. She said she had fallen in love with the old fixtures, cabinetry, tin ceiling and plank flooring.

“I really wanted to take it and save it, was what my initial thought was, and then after I got in here I thought, ‘Boy, Margaret, you’re going to have to figure out some way to generate income to support this itch that you have,’” she said.

She began work restoring the building right away. She said back then it didn’t look anything like it does now. One year later re-opened during Old Settlers weekend in 1999. After another year, Kraisinger decided to turn the store into an antique hardware store and began collecting architectural and furniture hardware. To get started, she bought four large lots from collectors and antique refinishers.

“Now today I can say with pretty good certainty I have one of the largest selections and collections in the whole area,” she said.

The store’s inventory covers a 100-year span from the Civil War era through the mid-1900s, and every bit of it is authentic—no reproductions.

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EMS Agreement Taking Shape Between Halstead, Sedgwick

Posted 6/29/2017

By Jared Janzen

HALSTEAD—Halstead city council approved an extension until July 31 of its temporary agreement of covering Sedgwick EMS during Monday night’s council meeting.

City Administrator Ethan Reimer also told the council that a second addendum to the agreement was in the works to get the cities to the end of 2017 before the actual long-term agreement takes place at the start of 2018.

Halstead EMS Director Anderson Lowe is making a list of the value of all Sedgwick EMS’s trucks and equipment. He’s worked with equipment companies to get an independent assessment of the value of Sedgwick’s equipment.

“Instead of it becoming a bickering ‘they said this value and they said no it’s this,’ I got the outside party to give us third-party values on things,” Lowe said.

Sedgwick EMS will give its equipment to Halstead in return for coverage through the end of the year.

“Our thought is, in exchange for the equipment…plus maintaining that $300 per run for the rest of the year would essentially be our service contract through Dec. 31, starting the new long-term contract Jan. 1 just so it’s clean for everybody,” Reimer said.

He asked for the council’s consensus to continue moving in this direction and to create a second addendum for the council’s approval in July.

“As long as you guys continue with the work you’ve been doing, as long as you and the mayor are involved in that process, we’re kind of all on the same page here with where we need to be,” council member Dennis Travis said. “So just continue with that work and then when you get a final draft we’ll take a look at it.”

Reimer said the total expense of covering Sedgwick EMS is estimated to be a little over $200,000 per year. This number will be offset by money allocated by the county for the Sedgwick district and revenue from ambulance runs.

“We subtracted those out to get what we considered a balance that would essentially be what we’re going to ask Sedgwick for in the long-term contract on a yearly basis to ensure that our taxpayers have no burden,” Reimer said.

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Second-Annual Community Picnic A Hit

Posted 6/29/2017

STAYING cool was easy for kids at Bentley’s picnic in the park thanks to several water activities, including wading pools and water squirters. STAYING cool was easy for kids at Bentley’s picnic in the park thanks to several water activities, including wading pools and water squirters. By Jared Janzen

BENTLEY—Dozens of community members came together at Bentley Park on Saturday during the city’s second-annual picnic in the park. The event was a success, according to Shavon Morgan with the Parks and Recreation Committee.

“It felt bigger than last year,” she said.

Kids of all ages enjoyed water activities like wading pools, water squirters and an inflatable slip-and-slide. There was also a prize walk sponsored by the Bentley United Methodist Church and a bouncy house.

An abundance of hamburgers and hot dogs were catered by Smokin’ Tom’s BBQ of Halstead.

The weather was ideal, balancing between warm enough for water activities but not too hot for everyone else.

BENTLEY United Methodist Church sponsored a prize walk, like a cakewalk without the cake. Kids could win small toys or candy. BENTLEY United Methodist Church sponsored a prize walk, like a cakewalk without the cake. Kids could win small toys or candy. “It’s not too windy, not too hot,” Morgan said. “This is perfect weather.”

The success of the picnic was seen as a bellwether of what the young park’s future could hold. It’s hoped to become a place for people to play flag football, soccer, volleyball or other activities.

“One of my goals is to get people out here (to the park) and enjoy it,” Mayor Rex Satterthwaite said.

Satterthwaite himself found a way to enjoy Saturday’s activities by taking a turn on the slip-in-slide, something he also did at last year’s picnic.

“Whenever the next mayor takes over, they’ll have to do this too,” he said. “It’s a tradition now.”

Leading up the picnic, city staff had worked to prepare the park for the picnic and for general use. The week before, staff had installed a water spigot where a hose was connected to for water activities.

“We really appreciate city workers getting that water put in,” Morgan said.

Staff also sprayed the park for broadleaf weeds to eliminate stickers, making the grass more welcoming to children’s bare feet.

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