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Halstead, KS 67056
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 This Week's Issue:

Harvey County Independent 7.17 IssueHarvey County Independent 7.17 Issue

 

Livestock Killed In Halstead Dog Attack

Posted 7/17/2014

By Frederick Bader

 Around 7:15 on Sunday morning, Stockebrand went out to the shed only to find a sheep lying by the feeder. “Then I heard dogs,” Stockebrand said. “I saw them attacking a goat. We couldn’t get the gun safe open, or we would have been out there sooner. There will be a rifle in the back of my closet now.”

When she saw the wounded sheep, Stockebrand called the sheriff, and two deputies responded. Deputies chased the dogs to what they thought was an abandoned house, which actually belongs to Ken Mayfield, the owner of at least one of the dogs. Two dogs fled but the other turned and charged a deputy, who shot it.

As Stockebrand walked around the property to assess her goat’s health, she came across more animals that had been wounded. “I saw one animal lying on the ground, then another, then another,” Stockebrand said. Ultimately, in addition to the two goats killed initially, eight other animals were injured to various degrees. Four will probably live, but may not breed because of the shock from the attack.

The attack was not the first on Stockebrand’s property. On August 13, 2013, two of the Stockebrands’ animals were attacked by the same dogs. A goat was killed and a ewe was attacked, but survived. That ewe died in this year’s attack. “The dogs didn’t eat anything, they just kill for the sake of killing,” Stockebrand said. “People should be aware of this. Those dogs live by the pool, where people swim, run, ride bikes… They could attack someone’s dog, or a person.”

Harvey County Sheriff T. Walton believes that his deputy acted correctly in putting down the dog. “It’s an unfortunate situation for all parties involved,” Walton said. “But the deputies saw the carnage that one dog in particular had committed. They weren’t sure, if the dogs got into the city of Halstead, if they could do that to a person.”

Last year’s incident, coupled with Sunday’s attack, has racked up over $2,000 in lost livestock. But the financial cost isn’t the only pain inflicted on the Stockebrands. “I was walking past the bodies and my granddaughter was calling them by name,” Stockebrand said. “I’m just glad she didn’t see them actually being attacked. It’s so hard for a child. It should never have to happen.”

“I truly feel for the owner of the dog and the children for whom this dog was a pet,” Walton said. “But you have to remember that those sheep and goats were pets too for the people who were raising them.”

Mayfield was not available for comment at the time of publication.

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Harmonious You In New Location On Main Street

Posted 7/17/2014

By Frederick Bader

HALSTEAD – After practicing as a nurse for 20 years and a massage specialist for three, Jessica Simmons is ready for the next step in her career. Her new massage clinic, Harmonious You, is now open at 306 Main Street.

Harmonious You is a new location, but Simmons is no stranger to the area. She had rented space in Halstead Chiropractic for three years before moving into this new location.

“It’s a five-year dream coming to fruition,” Simmons said. She studied nursing at Iowa Western University and massage therapy at Butler Community College. Although there is no state certification necessary to practice massage, Simmons went above and beyond to get a national certification.

Simmons prefers medical massage, often working with doctors and clinicians to provide pain and stress relief for those who need it most. “It’s all about quality of life here,” Simmons said. “Most people think massage is all about relaxation – and relaxation is great, it’s necessary – but massage can be so much more.”

To read more, see this week's print edition.

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Burrton Sees Decline In Property Values

Posted 7/17/2014

By Frederick Bader

BURRTON – Over the last year, the City of Burrton has seen property values diminish, which could strain the city’s budget that is reliant on property taxes.

 The county’s valuation of property in Burrton has fallen by more than $600,000 in the last year. The city council recently approved a five-mill tax increase in an attempt to keep the city’s revenue stable.

And to complicate matters, at a recent auction, houses used as rentals in Burrton sold for between $2,000 and $20,000, numbers that would make any potential buyers jump out of their seats. The auction may not be representative of the “actual” housing market in Burrton, though, according to Harvey County Appraiser Craig Clough.

“When you have 20 or more properties all sold in one day, through an auction, that’s a different market,” Clough said. “Properties that haven’t been exposed to the market by a realtor for a few weeks or a few months will sell for quite a bit less.”

To read more, see this week's print edition.

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Meet The Men Who Keep The River Moving

Posted 7/17/2014

By Pilar Martin

The Halstead Little Arkansas Water Drainage District is responsible for keeping the Little Arkansas River flowing and free from debris and has a history of doing that.

The original drainage district was started with mainly volunteers after the Halstead flood of 1951. There was so much debris in the water downstream after the flood, the water could not drain properly.

Today, the district has three members, Mike Creach, Kenny Wiens and Phil Schmidt.

Keeping the river clean of late has been monumental because of heavy June rains. The drainage district starts in the middle of the bridge on NW 36th Street, just outside of Harvey County West Park, and goes two miles south of Halstead. In drought conditions, the riverbanks and shoreline simply fall away. Big trees lose their root base and fall into the river. Other trees, because of age or disease, rot and fall onto the ground and banks of the river all of the time.

When flooding rains come, all of that debris is washed downriver until it deteriorates, gets caught, or is pulled out. Many bridges in the Drainage District have piles of trees and lumber jammed up against bridges, which can damage a bridge.

To read more, see this week's print edition.

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